Skip to main content

Welcome!

Welcome to my blog!

My name Is Isaac Shultz. I am a student pilot, who is eager to share the experience of flying with others.
 I believe the best way to go about that is buying an airplane of my own to fly young eagles in. Even though it may seem crazy, unreal, or just downright undoable; I am going to try something few teens would dare attempt. I want to build an airplane. Why am I even thinking about it now as a mere 14 year old? Well , because I am uniquely situated where I can realistically complete a kitplane such as a sonex before I'm off to college.



While other kids where being passed around from grandparent to aunt to other grandparent, I was flying. My first flight was when i was a mere 10 days old! I hope I thoroughly enjoyed myself!  As a toddler I played in the garage with wood scraps while my dad worked on his first homebuilt, a Minimax. When I was 6 my dad began a new kit, a Sonex it had lots of sharp metal pieces and I had to be very careful. but I still got my fair share of messing about in the form of clecoing scraps of aluminum together with all my might. Then the Sonex crashed and the second Sonex came. Again I played in the Garage, but this time I was older old enough to start building! I designed(with help) an aluminum boat for my lego guys to ride in. During that project I used the bandsaw, dill press, grinding wheel, Hole de-burr-er, rivet gun ,and more! Finally when I was 11 I got some stick time in our challenger II, and began my informal flight training. In less than 2 years I was making excellent landings, and flying to several airports around the local area. Now at the age of 14 I have a major (22hr) cross country under my belt, and am learning how to fly a Sonex.



While driving home from one of the monthly meeting of our local EAA chapter dad asked me if I wanted to go to the upcoming young eagles rally.” yes” I responded and I soon found myself riding in the Sonex to the rally. When we arrived I took a position on the ground and that day we flew over 100 young eagles! It was the that I realized ho much I wanted to be a pilot flying children who had never before flown in my own airplane. I wanted to see the smile spread across their faces as our wheels lift off the ground. I wanted to hear them oogle about how we were flying in the air, like birds.  I realized that there would be so much for me to return to the community if I only had my own airplane.



One day A Sonex kit listing came to my attention, and I shot the seller an E-mail with an offer, and ,to my surprise, she responded! I thought back to the day at the young eagles rally and realized that this was my opportunity to give back to aviation. The was a way to make my dream come true. My mind immediately stared racing, how could I raise the money for such a huge undertaking? I was already mowing lawns selling random things, and doing chores around the house. I concluded that I would need help, your help, to raise enough. Please help me make my vision come to pass, by donating to this project you will be helping to pass the torch of aviation to the next generation. by helping me you are securing the future of corncob bombing runs, spot landing contests, EAA BBQs , and fun flying everywhere       

              https://www.gofundme.com/isaacs-sonex-project-2uvexs38


Update (8-10-17) I am currently building a Sonex (the A model) I am having a blast at it, every Thursday I will release a Build Update detailing what I have accomplished over the week. I am having a blast building and as of august am nearly done with the wings. The tail feathers (H-Stab/V-Stab) and the control surfaces (elevator, rudder, ailerons, flaps) were already done when I bought the kit. I am still raising money to buy an engine and I am currently at 30% of my goal! 





The purpose of this blog is to document and share my experience of building and later flying an airplane. In the first portion, I will thank all the wonderful people who donated to me. Then in the second section I will post a building update, every week ,explaining what I have done  in detail and with pictures. Finally in the third and last section, I will post my flying adventures, and any maintenance I do. Thank you or your support and interest, I am pumped about this whole project.

Popular posts from this blog

Build Update: The Turtledeck November 2017

First off, what is a turtledeck? The answer is obvious at first, it is a wood platform on the back of the house, with a bunch of turtles sitting on it, right?



Or maybe it is what you call the deck of a cruise ship that is for turtle pleasure?





Well actually it is the round part of the plane behind the cockpit, that leads into the tail, as seen in this beautiful Sonex.


So, now that we know what a turtledeck is, I can get into how I built one!. Like everything, It started with a plans review. The turtledeck skin was made of 2 smaller skins (a left and right) and a central spine of a stiffening C-Channel. The skin then is curved to make it rounded, pretty, and aerodynamic.


I then prepared all the parts. The turtledeck formers were up to the plate first, they look like this:




I made sure that they had no stress rising scratches. (rule of thumb is that if you can catch a fingernail in the scratch, then it is too deep and must be buffed out.) Aside from that I checked them against the plans …

Build Update: Joining the Fuselage October 2017

Riveting the Fuselage side panels was extremely satisfying! After a few day's hard work, I had built up these huge 10' long metal structures! 



 I used cross ties that were akin to the vertical stiffeners. They were a C-shaped channel piece, with a prepilot drilled hole pattern that perfectly matched the spot they went. I clecoed them in place wit ha small cleco, and moved on to the next step.









And of course, once you accomplish something in your kit, don't forget to celebrate!




Build Update April 5 2018: Dissasembling the Aerovee

The engine I bought was already built, and had not been run. My dad and I planned to take it all apart to give me a better understanding of the engine, as well as to identify any problems before they got bad.

The Arovee engine was heavy and awkward to move. at the time it was sitting on the workbench with everything installed.

Going into this I had only enough sense to tell you which cylinder is the #1, 2, 3, and 4, and I knew some of the terminology, such as crackshaft. I frequently asked my dad "what do you call that part?"  we began unbolting stuff in roughly reverse order from the manual (if you're familiar with sonex plans, you're used to backwards) In under an hour we had stripped many of the external parts off and the engine had lost at least 20 pounds! A box was designated as the hardware box, so it'll be like legos trying to find the right bolts and nuts again when I reassemble it. the important part is that they're all together and not lost. After…